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President Infantino addresses G20 on tackling corruption in sport

Invited to speak on the fight against corruption in sport, President Infantino shared the lessons that the new FIFA has learned through its post-2016 reforms, as well as from the corruption scandal that brought down the previous administration.

Laying out the path taken by world football’s governing body in the first five years of his presidency, the FIFA President listed 11 key reforms designed “to tackle corruption, to bring back accountability in FIFA, in football more generally, and to safeguard the integrity of football and, of course, FIFA.”

In particular, those reforms were:

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Foreign Aid and corruption in Africa

African countries have been receiving FOREIGN AID since independence for the past 60years, and Africa is yet to be developed or self-reliant. Since 1970, the world has spent over five trillion dollars in aid. Much of that money has come to Africa. Helping Africa is a noble cause, but the campaign has become a theater of rampage corruption, and abuse of power.

The Marshall Plan was an American initiative passed in 1948 for foreign aid to Western Europe. The goals of the United States were to rebuild war-torn regions, remove trade barriers, modernize industry, improve European prosperity. However, it hasn’t been the case in Africa. Foreign Aid has contributed to corruption in Africa through the large amounts of money that are sent over, and exploitation of resources.

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Ghana climbs to 75th on latest global Corruption Perception Index

Ghana has improved her score on the latest Corruption Perception Index.

The 2020 report released by Transparency International saw the country score 43 points out of a possible 100, a two-point increase from 2019’s 41 points.

In the 2019 edition, Ghana was ranked 80th on the globe in terms of corruption perception and 10th in Sub-Saharan Africa.

However, the new figures show the country has climbed up to the 75th position in the world ranking while maintaining its 10th spot in Africa.

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Ghana scores average mark on 2020 Corruption Perceptions Index

Ghana has scored an average mark of 43 out of 100 on the 2020 Corruption Perceptions Index (CPI) released by Transparency International.

This left the country being ranked 75 out of 180 nations captured in the 2020 index.

The CPI draws upon 13 data sources which capture the assessment of experts and business executives on a number of corrupt behaviours in the public sector.

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Let’s use Cash Lite and Networth Aggregator to fight corruption in Ghana – Kwaku Antwi-Boasiako

You can have a million anti-corruption laws on Ghana’s statute books and even set up an Office of Special Prosecutor, but if a person can walk to a bank and withdraw ¢21 million in hard cash from his company’s bank account and distribute same in the name of business promotion without any trail of who received the money, then you must be joking if you think we are fighting corruption in Ghana! Once the Management and Board of Directors of the said company are in sync, there is little any auditor or anybody else can do about the disbursement of the ¢21 million in hard cash!

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ACEP launches report on gender budgeting of mineral revenue in Ghana

The Africa Centre for Energy Policy (ACEP) has launched a research report that exposes critical gender gaps in allocation of resources, utilization and benefits in mining communities in Ghana.

The report, which is titled, “Promoting gender budgeting: the case of Mineral royalty utilization in Ghana,” seeks to underscore the need to relook at how mineral revenue is allocated in view of the need to promote the welfare of women in mining communities.

In an opening remark before the launch of the report which was done via Zoom, the Executive Director of ACEP, Mr. Benjamin Boakye, said the essence of the report was to recognize that mining created impact and that the impact tended to be varied, “And in Ghana,… based on socio-cultural issues, women tend to suffer more than men.”

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Nigeria’s Protests and the Need for Bottom-Up Reform Across Africa

One of the rare times I made it through the international airport in Lagos with nary a request for a bribe, I was left feeling spooked. After all, during previous visits to Nigeria, I had had valuables seized right before my eyes under false pretenses; I had been detained in a cell awaiting ransom; and I had even once watched in alarmed disbelief as uniformed men with guns boarded my flight and extorted money from passengers, along with bottles of champagne from the crew, right there on the tarmac.

This time, as I exited the terminal, just as I was being greeted by a prearranged driver, a man in plainclothes approached to demand my passport. The driver whispered for me to ignore him and keep walking fast, after which the man in plainclothes flashed a gun under his shirt and said, “OK, you’ll see.”

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Assemblies’ Common Fund rip-off rises to GH¢124.82 million

Some officials of Metropolitan, Municipal and District Assemblies mismanaged funds and resources of their assemblies to a financial value of approximately GH¢124.82 million in 2019, the Auditor-General has revealed.

The financial irregularities for 2019 represent a 3.53% rise from the 2018 figure of approximately GH¢120.56 million. In nominal terms, the increase is approximately GH¢4.2m. 

“The findings once again showed lack of commitment on the part of the management of Assemblies in the implementation and enforcement of my audit recommendations towards mitigating infringements of the laws. I also attributed the situation to non-imposition of sanctions to minimise the violations,” says the Auditor-General in a letter transmitting his latest report to the Speaker of Parliament.

Comparative irregularities from 2015 to 2019 financial years
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Internal Audit Agency Swoops on MDAs

According to Mrs Juliet Aboagye-Wiafe, President of the Institute of Internal Auditors (IIA) Ghana, the work of internal auditors facilitate good corporate governance and compliance. These in turn ‘provide strong inputs for organisational or business sustainability and prevent corporate scandals, fraud and failures.’

Mrs Aboagye-Wiafe reportedly said this at the IIA’s 2019 Annual National Internal Audit and Governance Conference.

In June 2019, Auditor-General Mr. Daniel Yao Domelevo also stated that it is better to prevent corruption. Therefore, making internal auditors independent is one of the control mechanisms that government can put in place to prevent corruption. He even suggested to the Presidency to consider the inclusion of the Director General of the Internal Audit Agency (IAA) in Government’s Economic Management Team to help control expenditure within certain strategic sectors.  He took the view that internal auditors would provide timely information on lapses within the Public Financial Management system to enable the E. M. T. take judicious measures to address identified inefficiencies.

In spite of these authorities speaking favourably on internal auditors, Corruption Watch has come across cases from its investigations in which some internal auditors have allegedly been professionally abused and harassed for refusing to be compromised.

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Education on corruption has been underestimated in the country – Kofi Abotsi

The Dean of the Faculty of Law at the University of Professional Studies (UPSA) Kofi Abotsi has called for education on corruption to be intensified in the country.

He says the country has not been able to effectively deal with corruption because education on the vice is downplayed in the country.

“I think that the depth of civic education, particularly in our schools over the years has been problematic and that’s something we will want to look at and intensify so that people group with that mindset of the civic spirit,” he said.

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