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Mike Ohene-Effah: The Missing Manifesto

All the major political parties have launched their manifestoes for the December general elections.

This is highly commendable as it largely makes the campaigns issues-based…hopefully.

A manifesto is a declaration of aims and policy. It asks the question, “What do you believe?” It is supposed to be a party’s central policy document, and the political parties must be commended for making good progress on this since 1992, though we are increasingly seeing a shift to a litany of promises, projects and programmes in party manifestoes.

To begin with, various academics and governance experts in Ghana have raised issues with what the focus, content and size of political party manifestoes should be.

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A summary of the issues against the AGYAPA royalties deal

Yesterday, fifteen (15) individual civil society organisations and groups which were organized under the broad fraternity of “Alliance of CSOs Working on Extractives, Anti-corruption, and Good Governance” took the Agyapa debate a notch higher when they called for a suspension of the implementation of the MIIF.

The sum of their demand is that they want all the documents relating to the establishment of the Agyapa Royalties Limited, and its beneficial owners to be “disclosed” before government continues with the implementation of the deal.

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Keep track of projects in your area – NCCE urges local communities

Residents in local communities have been encouraged to own developmental projects and policies ongoing in their communities in order to seek for accountability from duty bearers.

Additionally, they must endeavour to increase their knowledge on the operations of the Local Government and actively involve themselves in the development process of the assembly.

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Ghana has failed woefully in its fight against corruption – Kojo Asante

The Director of Advocacy and Policy Engagement at the Ghana Center for Democratic Development (CDD-Ghana) says that Ghana’s fight against corruption has failed so far.

Dr Kojo Pumpuni Asante said corruption in Ghana is very prevalent and is pervasive such that people have accepted it as a way of life.

“People get fatigued by hearing about corruption because they feel helpless in tackling it. For me that is the most dangerous thing because it is an acceptance of a certain type of society where basically honesty and integrity are rare. If you are honest and truthful, you are actually at risk, they feel that you are a danger to those who want to be dishonest,” he said.

According to Dr Asante, tackling corruption goes beyond the two major political parties in the country.

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Zongo Dev’t Fund in GH₵ 5M procurement breach

A Corruption Watch investigation has uncovered that the Zongo Development Fund (ZoDF) has engaged in alleged procurement malpractices in the purchase of goods, services and works worth GHC5.0 million. The management of ZoDF allegedly superintended procurement breaches such as inflation of contract figures and breaching of entity head’s threshold.

Corruption Watch established that two hundred thousand Ghana cedis (GHC200,000) of the GHC5.0 million was spent on a contract for COVID-19 PPEs. 

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How parts of the media in Ghana aid – rather than fight – corruption

Corruption is a significant obstacle to development, democratic consolidation and environmental security, particularly in the developing world. It involves a misuse of power in serving private ends at the public expense. Corruption occurs in both the public and private sectors.

There are different forms of corruption. Political corruption is a classic example. It is often committed by politicians and top government officials acting alone or collaborating with other actors to advance private agendas.

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Over 2,700 Ghanaians sign petition demanding Domelevo’s recall

About 2,700 individuals have signed a petition calling on President Akufo-Addo to reconsider his directive for the Auditor-General, Daniel Domelevo to take his accumulated leave.

These calls follow similar moves by other civil society organisations demanding the A-G’s return from his 167 leave days.

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‘Let’s Intensify Corruption Fight In Music Industry’

Chief Executive officer (CEO) of Speech Production, Enock Agyepong, has described as unfortunate activities of some leaders in Ghana’s music industry, whose activities are contributing to the collapse of the industry.

Labelling such people as thieves and nation wreckers, Mr. Agyepong said the increasing rate of corruption in the music industry had gravely affected the lives of many musicians especially, aged ones, who were finding it difficult to make ends meet.

The music producer said the fight against corruption should not only target corrupt music stakeholders but also politicians and other leaders, whose corrupt activities had brought the industry to a standstill.

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The RTI Law: A tool to combat corruption or otherwise?

Over the years, journalists, civil society and anti-corruption advocates have campaigned for passage of the Right to Information (RTI) bill, and argued that nonexistence of the law prohibits people from knowing what is happening in public institutions – hence breeding corruption.

Even though the right to information is a basic right enshrined in the 1992 Constitution of Ghana, it took decades for the country to promulgate the RTI to provide a legal framework for implementation of the constitutional right to access information from public institutions.

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