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World Whistleblowing Day: AFRICMIL Calls For Passage Of Whistleblower Protection Law In Nigeria

The African Centre for Media & Information Literacy (AFRICMIL) has called for the passage of a whistleblower protection law in Nigeria. In a statement to mark this year’s World Whistleblowing Day, the organisation noted that Nigeria is playing catch-up with an issue other African countries like Ghana, South Africa, and Uganda have formalized.

Since the return to democracy in 1999, there have been several unsuccessful attempts to pass a law for the protection of whistleblowers in Nigeria. In December 2016, the federal government introduced a whistleblower policy, which does not provide a legal framework for the protection of whistleblowers.

Different countries around the world are realizing the importance of whistleblowers who have been described as the “first line of defence against crimecorruption and cover-up.” June 23 every year is celebrated as World Whistleblowing Day to raise public awareness about the important role of whistleblowers in combating corruption.

This year’s celebration is coming on the heels of a global pandemic (COVID-19) that has created a great deal of anxiety and uncertainty for Nigerians. It has also highlighted the importance of accountability and the need for regular and reliable information from public and private institutions and officials.

“It’s for this reason that we need Nigerians to speak up and be listened to if they have concerns about health and safety, fraud or other types of wrongdoing in the public interest in the management of the COVID-19 crisis, said Chido Onumah, Coordinator of AFRICMIL.

“Nigerians need to know the truth about the spread of the disease to respond effectively and help protect their communities. Transparency is vital and never more so than during a pandemic. We encourage all citizens and workers to participate in ensuring our governments, corporate institutions, both public and private, remain accountable during this crisis and beyond.”

We celebrate whistleblowers in the country for their patriotism. They keep us safe and ensure that funds are not diverted when they speak out against fraud, abuse and corruption.

In the last three years, AFRICMIL has been implementing a project tagged Corruption Anonymous , supported by the MacArthur Foundation , which aims to highlight the importance of whistleblowing in the fight against corruption and the need to protect whistle blowers from retaliation.

Source: Chido Onumah (modernghana.com)

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It takes ‘debt-free’ politicians to fight corruption

What does it take to curtail corruption in a country like Ghana?

I reckon it will take volumes to address this “pandemic” but before politicians look for a cheap antidote by pointing fingers at their opponents within and outwit their political parties, I suggest they start to look within their own political policies and processes of how people are elected to become members of parliaments(MP).

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Ghana’s Education Is The Root Of Ghana’s Corruption…Ghana’s Major Challenge

Education they say is the key to success. But in my opinion, education in the case of Ghana is the root cause of corruption in Ghana.

In Ghana, one of the major challenges facing the implementation of political and other policies is Corruption. Many including political governments are greatly affected by this practice. For this reason, those affected try to curb the menace without knowing and possibly tracing the root cause.

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Finance Ministry, GRA to crack down on corrupt officers

To root out corrupt revenue collection officials in the country, the Ghana Revenue Authority (GRA) and Ministry of Finance have established a Tax Audit and Quality Assurance Unit.

A bold move, according to some industry voices, the new department will deal with all complaints of corruption and ensure that the public gets redress for any concern brought before it. It will also serve as the auditing arm of the GRA and re-audit the work of officers to ensure they have not shortchanged government through their actions, knowingly or unknowingly.

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Digitizing mining licences will reduce corruption – GII report

To promote transparency and reduce all corruption risks associated with the awarding of mining licenses and permits, face-to-face processing must be replaced with digitisation, a new report by Ghana Integrity Initiative (GII), the local chapter of Transparency International, has recommended.

Titled ‘Corruption Risk Assessment Report on Mineral Mining Licensing in Ghana’, the report said manual processing of applications exposes both the applicants and public officials to potential corruption, hence, it should be substituted with an electronic system of application to minimise or eliminate the risk.

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‘Let’s Intensify Corruption Fight In Music Industry’

Chief Executive officer (CEO) of Speech Production, Enock Agyepong, has described as unfortunate activities of some leaders in Ghana’s music industry, whose activities are contributing to the collapse of the industry.

Labelling such people as thieves and nation wreckers, Mr. Agyepong said the increasing rate of corruption in the music industry had gravely affected the lives of many musicians especially, aged ones, who were finding it difficult to make ends meet.

The music producer said the fight against corruption should not only target corrupt music stakeholders but also politicians and other leaders, whose corrupt activities had brought the industry to a standstill.

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Corruption Doesn’t Have A Colour

Africa has always been perceived by western nations as a corrupt continent, with almost all the international organisations and rating agencies rating the continent as high risk. But the truth is that corruption has always existed in different forms and is not determined by politics or geography. It exists in rich and poor countries, the developed and developing nations alike. However, countries in Africa seem to be penalised for corruption a lot more and are often perceived as more corrupt than other places.

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The RTI Law: A tool to combat corruption or otherwise?

Over the years, journalists, civil society and anti-corruption advocates have campaigned for passage of the Right to Information (RTI) bill, and argued that nonexistence of the law prohibits people from knowing what is happening in public institutions – hence breeding corruption.

Even though the right to information is a basic right enshrined in the 1992 Constitution of Ghana, it took decades for the country to promulgate the RTI to provide a legal framework for implementation of the constitutional right to access information from public institutions.

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Intensify seizure of assets of corrupt officials – Experts say as Corruption Watch launches Webcast series

Two anti-corruption experts have said the recent order by an Accra High Court for the seizure of assets of persons convicted in the NCA case is a significant deterring anti-corruption measure.

Overall, they view Justice Eric Kyei Baffour’s judgement as the clearest indication yet of the application of laws to combat corruption.

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Breakdown of the NCA scandal

The NPP government’s first attempt at prosecuting alleged corrupt persons when it took office was when the Attorney General’s (AG) Department arraigned before court, persons allegedly involved in the $6million National Communications Authority (NCA) corruption case. This was in December 2017.

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