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Corruption Doesn’t Have A Colour

Africa has always been perceived by western nations as a corrupt continent, with almost all the international organisations and rating agencies rating the continent as high risk. But the truth is that corruption has always existed in different forms and is not determined by politics or geography. It exists in rich and poor countries, the developed and developing nations alike. However, countries in Africa seem to be penalised for corruption a lot more and are often perceived as more corrupt than other places.

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Ghana has tried to be responsible with its oil wealth. This is how.

After Ghana discovered oil and gas in 2007, the government and civil society aspired to avoid the “resource curse”. This is when countries have an abundance of non-renewable natural resources but no economic growth.

Nigeria, Sudan, Angola, Cameroon, Equatorial Guinea and Chad are among the oil producers that have failed to channel their resources into the material improvement of their countries and people.

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The RTI Law: A tool to combat corruption or otherwise?

Over the years, journalists, civil society and anti-corruption advocates have campaigned for passage of the Right to Information (RTI) bill, and argued that nonexistence of the law prohibits people from knowing what is happening in public institutions – hence breeding corruption.

Even though the right to information is a basic right enshrined in the 1992 Constitution of Ghana, it took decades for the country to promulgate the RTI to provide a legal framework for implementation of the constitutional right to access information from public institutions.

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