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Special Prosecutor resignation furore at a glance

This country set up the Office of the Special Prosecutor (OSP) with the hope that it can deal with grand corruption of politically exposed persons; and, for a long time we waited for the OSP to bite. Therefore, it was refreshing when Mr Amidu released the report of an analysis of the risk of corruption in the Agyapa Minerals Royalties transaction. 

It was instructive because it was the first time that an independent anti-corruption agency established by any government in Ghana had undertaken an analysis of the risk of corruption and anti-corruption risk assessment of the processes leading up to the approval by parliament of public agreements as part of its statutory mandate.

Alas! The celebration lasted for only two weeks. On Monday, 16th November 2020, Mr Martin A.B.K. Amidu resigned from his post as Special Prosecutor. On Tuesday, President Akufo-Addo, through Chief of Staff Hon. Akosua Frema Osei-Opare, wrote back to Mr Amidu to accept his resignation. 

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Corruption, influence peddling by FA Officials affecting quality of coaching in Ghana – Coach Inkoom

Head Coach of National Women’s League side Sea Lions Ladies FC, Maapa Inkoom has opined that favouritism, cronyism, and interference from top officials is affecting the work of coaches.

Speaking exclusively to Nhyiraba Kwabena Asirifi on Rainbow Sports on Rainbow Radio 87.5 FM, he said one major challenge coaches face especially at the national level is the inference by FA officials who chose the kind of players to be selected for tournaments.

He told the host that as a coach if you are unable to be firm and do your work, some FA officials will dictate to you and tell you to select certain players who lack the merit to join the national teams.

Mr. Inkoom warned this attitude and corrupt act will affect the quality of our national teams if we fail to deal with it.

He also bemoaned the situation where friends and other close associates of coaches try to influence their work by forcing them to chose certain players even when they are not good.

He added that players should merit a call so they do not expose the coach to public ridicule.

Mr. Inkoom underscored the need for stakeholders to allow coaches to work independently and stop taking money from people to select their choice of players.

“There are some senior FA officials who try to influence the selection process because of the money they will make. Influence peddling, cronyism, favoritism, and friendship are some of the factors affecting the quality of coaching in Ghana. As a coach, if you don’t stamp your authority, people will influence you to select players who are not good and in the end, you will be blamed for their incompetence.”

Source: Rainbowradioonline.com

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Corruption is like a baton passed on from government to government – Nana Oppong

Private legal practitioner and anti-corruption crusader, Dr. Nana Oppong has said that the move to completely eliminate corruption in Ghana, will be a difficult task to undertake because it is something that is passed on from one government to another.

He said that with the kind of laws we have in the country, inherited from our colonial masters, people, especially in authority, have been empowered to continue to engage in acts of corruption with no punishments clearly enshrined in law for their conducts.

“It is our laws that embolden people to be corrupt, giving them the power to engage in acts of corruption. Our laws also protect corrupt persons, allowing for justifications even when they commit them. This is also because not much has been done by past and present governments to deal with it,” he said.

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Let’s use Cash Lite and Networth Aggregator to fight corruption in Ghana – Kwaku Antwi-Boasiako

You can have a million anti-corruption laws on Ghana’s statute books and even set up an Office of Special Prosecutor, but if a person can walk to a bank and withdraw ¢21 million in hard cash from his company’s bank account and distribute same in the name of business promotion without any trail of who received the money, then you must be joking if you think we are fighting corruption in Ghana! Once the Management and Board of Directors of the said company are in sync, there is little any auditor or anybody else can do about the disbursement of the ¢21 million in hard cash!

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ACEP launches report on gender budgeting of mineral revenue in Ghana

The Africa Centre for Energy Policy (ACEP) has launched a research report that exposes critical gender gaps in allocation of resources, utilization and benefits in mining communities in Ghana.

The report, which is titled, “Promoting gender budgeting: the case of Mineral royalty utilization in Ghana,” seeks to underscore the need to relook at how mineral revenue is allocated in view of the need to promote the welfare of women in mining communities.

In an opening remark before the launch of the report which was done via Zoom, the Executive Director of ACEP, Mr. Benjamin Boakye, said the essence of the report was to recognize that mining created impact and that the impact tended to be varied, “And in Ghana,… based on socio-cultural issues, women tend to suffer more than men.”

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Less than 2 million Ghanaians pay tax – GACC

About 1.5 million out of the six million eligible Ghanaian taxpayers pay tax, allotting Ghana one of the lowest tax to Gross Domestic Product (GDP) ratio in Africa.

Ghana, therefore, has a lot to do to meet the Sub-Saharan average target of 17 per cent which is above the nation’s 13 per cent mark as her various governments have over the years tried to upscale.

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Dr Opuni directed testing period for agrochemicals to be shortened – Witness

The former Chief Executive Officer of COCOBOD, Dr Stephen Opuni, directed that the testing period of agrochemicals and fertilizers for use by the board should be shortened.

Police Detective Chief Inspector, Thomas Prempeh Mercer, the investigator in the trial, told the court.

Mr Prempeh said Dr. Opuni in giving the directive to the scientist from the Cocoa Research Institute of Ghana (CRIG) present at a meeting, said suppliers did take undue advantage of the monopoly they enjoyed and charged high prices on their products.

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Make judicious use of corruption reporting platforms – GII

The Ghana Integrity Initiative (GII), local chapter of Transparency International, has encouraged Ghanaians to take advantage of the available corruption reporting platforms to report corruption incidents.

The GII said as part of efforts to make corruption reporting easier, many platforms such as the Advocacy and legal Advocacy Centre (ALAC), IPAIDABRIBE, and Eye on Corruption had been created.

Speaking during a community engagement programme dubbed; “Increasing Citizens Power to Fight Corruption: Contributions of the Judicial Service,” in Takoradi, Mr Michael Boadi, Corporate Affairs Manager of the GII, said Ghanaians must fully make use of such platforms to report corrupt practices and support institutions to work efficiently.

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Agyapa deal: We’ve had very little pay from prosecutions in corruption fight – H.K Prempeh

Executive Director of the Centre for Democratic Development (CDD) Ghana says it’s about time the country explores other anti-corruption procedures as investments in prosecutions and prosecutorial bodies have not really paid off.

Professor Henry Kwasi Prempeh said Ghana’s over dependence on prosecutorial processes as a means of fighting corruption have not been satisfactory and thus has called for a review to include other anti-corruption procedures as well.

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Corrupt practices and elections

Elections constitute one of the key pillars of a vibrant democracy, where leaders assume power following transparent, free, fair and competitive polls.

Regrettably, these processes are plagued by irregularities and corruption, resulting in armed conflicts in many African countries.

Usually, citizens’ rights to participate in the electoral process are corruptly influenced, limiting their free choice of a candidate.

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